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New Study Finds Arctic Getting Darker, Earth Getting Warmer

In a new study it is found the Arctic is no more as bright as it used to be. It has become darker with more melting of ice in the ocean, which suggests it is the effect of global problem. With more water in the summer, more dark, less heat of the sun is reflected back into space. As a consequence the Earth is absorbing more of the heat than expected, says research. The new study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday. It is said in the study the extra absorbed energy is very big and measures about one-fourth of the entire heat-trapping effect of carbon dioxide. Ian Eisenman, lead author of the study, said between 1979 and 2011 the Arctic grew 8 percent darker. Eisenman is a climate scientist at the Scripps Institute of..


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New Study Finds Arctic Getting Darker, Earth Getting Warmer


By . Published on Feb 18, 2014. 0

In a new study it is found the Arctic is no more as bright as it used to be. It has become darker with more melting of ice in the ocean, which suggests it is the effect of global problem.

With more water in the summer, more dark, less heat of the sun is reflected back into space. As a consequence the Earth is absorbing more of the heat than expected, says research.
glacier
The new study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday. It is said in the study the extra absorbed energy is very big and measures about one-fourth of the entire heat-trapping effect of carbon dioxide.

Ian Eisenman, lead author of the study, said between 1979 and 2011 the Arctic grew 8 percent darker. Eisenman is a climate scientist at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography in California.

By measuring more darker Arctic he says it means more warming. The North Pole is an ocean and is mostly crusted at the top with ice in the summer, and in fall it grows back. It shrunk about 35,000 square miles at the time of melting peak in September per year since 1979.

Jason Box of the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland said when more of the sunlight in summer is dumped into the ocean, the water too gets warmer and hence it results with longer time for the ice to form again in the fall.

Jason was not a part of the study.

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